For Participants

PARTICIPANTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO TRY NEW THINGS AND LEARN NEW SKILLS. ALONG THE WAY THEY WILL HELP OTHERS, MAKE FRIENDS AND DISCOVER SKILLS AND TALENTS THEY NEVER KNEW THEY HAD.

After a Participant has registered for the appropriate level (with the help of a parent or Award Coordinator) they can start their The Compass Award journey.

HOW TO GET STARTED

PARTICIPANTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO TRY NEW THINGS AND LEARN NEW SKILLS. ALONG THE WAY THEY WILL HELP OTHERS, MAKE FRIENDS AND DISCOVER SKILLS AND TALENTS THEY NEVER KNEW THEY HAD.

1. Choose Award activities

The structure of the program gives Participants the chance to develop in key areas contributing to their overall wellbeing. The Award Sections are designed specifically to

  • enhance their physical wellbeing, through Physical Activity

  • enhance their mind, through Hobbies

  • connect with their community through Volunteering

  • learn about their environment through Exploration

Participants may choose activities that they are already involved in or activities that are completely new to them. It is not necessary to have identified all activities at the start. Participants may commence their Sections at any time.

2. Identify activity Mentors

  • Participants must have a Mentor for every Award section.

  • The Mentor is an adult who is more skilled or experienced than the Participant in that activity and willing to mentor them to pursue their goals.

  • Although parents and family members are encouraged to help Participants with their Award activities, the Mentor should not be related to the Participant.

  • The Mentor can be a teacher, coach or a family friend.

3. Set Goals for each activity

  • Participants should work with each Mentor to set themselves challenging goals for each activity.
  • Work towards an end point, plan The Award to fit with other commitments.

4. Recording hours and COMPLETION!

  • Participants receive a Record Book in which they must record their hours of participation for each activity and their Mentors must write a brief report about the Participants effort and progress.

  • On completion of all requirements for the level being undertaken, Record Books must be submitted to the Coordinator for approval before a badge and certificate are presented to the Participant.

  • Only one level of The Compass Award may be undertaken at a time, all requirements for each Level must be completed before Participants may progress to the next level.

The program is structured over four progressive levels.

To achieve The Compass Award at any Level, young people create a unique program of activities (for a set length of time) across four Sections:

Award Levels and Requirements Overview

INDIVIDUAL LEVEL CRITERIA

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

To encourage participation in physical recreation and improvement in physical fitness and performance.

This section of The Compass Award allows you to have a go at a new fitness activity, or focus on developing a physical activity you already do. The purpose is to establish a positive attitude to physical activity, to gain satisfaction from meeting the challenge and to lay the pattern for an ongoing active lifestyle.

Your goal should reflect the improvement in physical ability you are aiming for in your chosen activity.

You are required to show perseverance and commitment through ongoing involvement, and needs to be taught by a suitably qualified or experienced adult. As your knowledge and skills improve, enjoyment levels will increase as well!

REQUIREMENTS

  • It is essential that you show regular commitment, and that you complete the majority of the required hours in your own time.

  • Your Coordinator can guide you when choosing an activity, but make sure you choose an activity that you are interested in and that you can devote your time to.

  • You must gain a good knowledge of the activity’s rules and safety requirements.

  • You need to receive some mentoring from an experienced adult. This person would be the appropriate Mentor for your activity.

  • You should strive to achieve a personal goal in this activity. The goal must be discussed with your Mentor and then written in your Record Book at the start of the activity.

EXAMPLE ACTIVITIES

  • Abseiling
  • Aerobics
  • Archery
  • Athletics
  • Aussie Rules Football
  • Badminton
  • Ballet
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Bowls
  • Bush Walking
  • Boxing
  • Canoeing
  • Carpet Bowls
  • Cricket
  • Croquet
  • Cross Country
  • Cycling
  • Dancing
  • Diving
  • Folk Dancing
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Handball
  • Hiking
  • Hockey
  • Horse Riding
  • Ice Hockey
  • Ice Skating
  • Indoor Cricket
  • Indoor Rock Climbing
  • Jogging
  • Judo
  • Karate
  • Kayaking
  • Lacrosse
  • Line Dancing
  • Little Athletics
  • Marching
  • Mountain Bike Riding
  • Netball
  • Orienteering
  • Polo
  • Polo Crosse
  • Power Walking
  • Racquetball
  • Rock Climbing
  • Roller Blading
  • Roller Skating
  • Rounders
  • Rowing
  • Rugby
  • Running
  • Sailing
  • Skateboarding
  • Skiing
  • Skipping
  • Snowboarding
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Square Dancing
  • Squash
  • Surfing
  • Swimming
  • Table Tennis
  • Tap Dancing
  • Tae-Kwon Do
  • Ten Pin Bowls
  • Tennis
  • Trampolining
  • Triathlon
  • Volleyball
  • Walking
  • Water Polo
  • Water Skiing
  • Windsurfing
  • X-Country Skiing
  • Yoga

HOBBIES

To encourage development of personal interests and practical skills.

In this part of the program, you are encouraged to follow your own interests in non-physical hobbies and leisure activities. To begin with, some time will be spent finding out what is available in the area you are in, and this is where your Coordinator can guide you. Have a go at an activity that interests you, and provides you with the opportunity to build on existing skills or develop new skills.

Your goal should reflect your aim to improve your ability in this activity.

You are required to show perseverance and commitment through ongoing involvement, and need to be taught by a suitably qualified or experienced adult. Remember, this activity must be non-physical, so that means your Hobby should not be sport, dance, martial arts or any other activity that would fit into the Physical Activity section.

CHOOSING AN ACTIVITY

You may choose an activity which will be done independently or within a group situation.

The choice should involve some challenge and result in you gaining new skills and knowledge. You may take on a new hobby or skill for each Level, or spend more than one Level on a particular choice. If using the same activity for a new Level, change your goal.

It is your decision, but make sure your choice offers new experiences and challenges!

Much will depend on what is available in the community and the costs which may be part of the activity.

EXAMPLE ACTIVITIES

  • Amateur Radio
  • Art/Craft
  • Astronomy
  • Ballet Choreography
  • Bird Watching
  • Boat Building
  • Bush Survival Skills
  • Calligraphy
  • Candle Making
  • Card Making
  • Ceramics
  • Chess
  • China Painting
  • Choir Member
  • Coaching
  • Computing
  • Cooking
  • Cross Stitch
  • Cycle Maintenance
  • Debating
  • Dog Training
  • Doll Making
  • Drama
  • Drawing
  • Directing
  • Electronics
  • Embroidery
  • Fabric Printing
  • Film Production
  • Fishing
  • Gardening
  • Jewellery Making
  • Junior Fire Brigade
  • Knitting
  • Learning A Language
  • Lighting / Sound
  • Macramé
  • Map Making
  • Map Reading
  • Model Construction
  • Mosaics
  • Origami
  • Painting
  • Pet Care
  • Photography
  • Playing An Instrument
  • Pottery
  • Printing
  • Public Speaking
  • Puppetry
  • Research Ie: Animal, Sport History, Person Etc
  • School Production
  • Screen Printing
  • Sewing
  • Sign Language
  • Stage Help
  • Tapestry

VOLUNTEERING

To develop and encourage a sense of community spirit and responsibility to others.

This section is based on the belief that all members of a community should appreciate and understand the roles that paid and voluntary workers provide to the broader community. In addition, this section is designed for you to develop a sense of community and a feeling of responsibility to others. In this way it is hoped that you will develop a lifetime commitment to community involvement.

CHOOSING AN ACTIVITY

Before choosing an activity, have a think about what services are out there providing assistance to others, and how you would like to get involved in your community (either at school or in your wider community).

After this stage, you should discuss your areas of interest with your Coordinator who can assist you to decide on a suitable task which is age-appropriate and interesting. If the activity involves visits to outside groups, then it may be necessary for parents to be involved.

You should inform your Coordinator about relevant details.

COMMUNITY GROUPS

Participants should provide useful service. Learn more about community groups by inviting speakers to school or making visits to local venues:

CFA, SES, Service Clubs such as Rotary, Lions, Apex, Ambulance Service, Public Library, Pre-School, Park Rangers, RSPCA, Hospital, Senior Citizens’ Club, Citizens’ Advice Bureau, Nursing Homes, Meals on Wheels, Salvation Army, National Trust, Conservation Groups.

EXAMPLE EXPLORATIONS

AT SCHOOL

  • Join the Junior School Council or SRC
  • Become a library assistant
  • Cross-age tutoring
  • Peer Support
  • Fundraising
  • Gardening
  • Publish a student newsletter
  • Run a lunchtime group eg. art, chess, debating, photography

 

CHILDREN

  • Conduct regular visits to pre-schools and help out, or go to hospitals where you can talk to younger children

 

ENVIRONMENT

  • Organise litter collection
  • Visit National Trust properties
  • Help to maintain local facilities eg. walking tracks

 

FUNDRAISING

  • Take on community service projects and school fundraising drives

 

COMMUNITY SUPPORT

Participate in, for example:

  • The school band playing for community groups
  • Hospital visits
  • Reading and letter writing service to the elderly
  • Shopping for the housebound

EXPLORATION

To encourage a spirit of adventure and discovery.

This is an exciting and challenging section which offers you the chance to arrange an adventure away from home which needs some planning, training and teamwork!

The trip must have a goal, other than just journeying to a certain destination.

Your goal should reflect the purpose you are aiming to achieve. Your objective might be to find out more about a location, its history or geography. Therefore, it would be suitable to write a brief report or give a talk to your Mentor or class about what you have discovered during your travels!  Often school camps will provide a suitable framework for this expedition, or it may be that parents can supervise weekend or school holiday trips.

REQUIREMENTS AND PURPOSE OF ACTIVITY

Before you head out on your journey, you will need to receive some basic training from someone who is experienced. This is to ensure that you are well prepared for your journey, and includes the following:

  • Communication methods eg. use of mobile phones, meeting arrangements, contact numbers, emergency contacts

  • Obtaining equipment, food and clothing

  • Camp craft

  • Learning to properly use and take care of gear

  • Becoming familiar with safety and first aid procedures

  • Map reading/navigation

All explorations must be supervised by an adult, but you need to show initiative and take charge of the Exploration (with guidance when needed). All trips should have a purpose which is clearly defined before you begin the activity.

You must undertake planning of your journey in consultation with the adult who is going to be your Mentor. You must also consult with the adult/s who will be going with you and supervising you to make sure that your planning suits them. The person who supervises you may be a parent, however your parent should not be your Mentor.

EXAMPLE EXPLORATIONS

WALKING

  • National parks
  • Coastal parks
  • Waterfalls
  • Mountain ranges etc

 

CANOEING

  • Nearby rivers and lakes

 

CYCLING

  • National parks
  • State forests
  • Local bike trails

 

CITY/LOCAL SITES

  • Museums
  • Art Galleries
  • National Trust Properties
  • Historical landmarks/sites
  • Zoo
  • Planetarium
  • Scienceworks

 

School camps and excursions will also provide many opportunities, but remember – you need to be involved in planning and running your exploration!